What Is The Most Important Goal Of The Paris Agreement

The Paris Agreement is the first legally binding universal global agreement on climate change adopted at the Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21) in December 2015. To contribute to the goals of the agreement, countries presented comprehensive national climate change plans (national fixed contributions, NDC). These are not yet sufficient to meet the agreed temperature targets, but the agreement points to the way forward for further measures. Under the Paris Agreement, each country must define, plan and report regularly on its contribution to the fight against global warming. [6] There is no mechanism for a country[7] to set an emission target for a specified date,[8] but any target should go beyond the previous targets. The United States formally withdrew from the agreement the day after the 2020 presidential election,[9] although President-elect Joe Biden said America would return to the agreement after his inauguration. [10] Some countries have already responded to an invitation from the Conference of the Parties (COP) to communicate mid-century strategies, with 2050 considered the reference year. Most of these countries have translated their long-term vision into a target as a percentage reduction, which, in Germany`s case, is to fall to 95% below the 1990 level by 2050. This quantified objective is certainly not a binding law, but it allows Germany to monitor the neutrality of emissions step by step and beyond its political cycles. It encourages different segments of government to continuously seek emission reduction options, now and in the future, in the hope that each of them can take the necessary steps to achieve this 95% reduction. As mentioned above, the paris agreement`s target is 1.5 degrees Celsius outside the Cancun agreement limit of less than 2 degrees Celsius and aims to keep warming well below 2 degrees Celsius and to continue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius. A preliminary inventory-impact study was published in Nature Communications in April 2020. Based on a public policy database and a multi-model scenario analysis, the authors showed that the implementation of current strategies by 2030 leaves an average emission gap of 22.4 to 28.2 GtCO2eq, with optimal means to achieve targets well below 2 degrees Celsius and 1.5 degrees Celsius.

If national contributions were fully implemented, this gap would be reduced by one-third. The countries assessed did not achieve their promised contributions with implemented measures (implementation deficit) or experienced a gap in ambition with optimal paths to well below 2oC. The study showed that all countries should accelerate the implementation of renewable technology strategies, while improving efficiency in emerging and fossil fuel-dependent countries is particularly important. [31] When, on October 5, 2016, the agreement received enough signatures to cross the threshold, U.S. President Barack Obama said, “Even if we achieve all the goals…